Planet of the Apes (1968) | Cinemallennials

On today’s episode of Cinemallennials I talked with my cousin Devon about the 1968 science fiction classic, Planet of the Apes, directed by Franklin J. Schaffner and starring Charlton Heston, Roddy McDowall, and Kim Hunter. Planet of the Apes follows the story of a crew of astronauts that crash land on a planet 300 millionContinue reading “Planet of the Apes (1968) | Cinemallennials”

The Seventh Seal (1957) | Cinemallennials

On this episode of Cinemallennials I talked with Oisín Ó Ruacháinn about Ingmar Bergman’s 1957 allegorical masterpiece, The Seventh Seal, a personal favorite of mine and is often considered to be one of the all-time greatest films ever made. The Seventh Seal launched Bergman’s reputation as a world-class director, ushered in a new era of theContinue reading “The Seventh Seal (1957) | Cinemallennials”

Godzilla (1954) | Cinemallennials

On today’s episode, I talked with Izzy from Be Kind Rewind, her YouTube channel where she explores Hollywood history, women in film, and general film studies. Izzy picked the original 1954 Godzilla just in time for the newest chapter in the longest running franchise in film history, Godzilla vs. Kong that comes out today internationallyContinue reading “Godzilla (1954) | Cinemallennials”

Paths of Glory (1957) | Cinemallennials

On today’s episode, I talked with Nick Reed about the 1957 anti-war film, Paths of Glory, directed by the great Stanley Kubrick. Based on real-life events, Paths of Glory stars Kirk Douglas as Colonel Dax, who is ordered by his pompous, and overambitious commanding officer, played by George Macready to lead a suicide mission. AfterContinue reading “Paths of Glory (1957) | Cinemallennials”

Seven Samurai (1954) | Cinemallennials

On today’s episode, I am joined by my cousin Sean Clark who picked Akira Kurosawa’s 1954 epic Seven Samurai. It’s considered from both a technical and ­­ cultural level, whether it be from its editing, camera techniques, symbolism, and its dialogue, as the most influential, remade, reworked, and referenced films of all time as wellContinue reading “Seven Samurai (1954) | Cinemallennials”

The Big Sleep (1946) | Cinemallennials

On today’s episode, I talked with Devin Araujo about the 1946 noir, The Big Sleep. Produced and directed by the legendary Howard Hawks, starring the equally as legendary Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, who previously enchanted the word over in 1944’s To Have and Have Not, causing a massive call for the two stars andContinue reading “The Big Sleep (1946) | Cinemallennials”

North by Northwest (1959) | Cinemallennials

On today’s episode, I talked with an old-school friend of mine, Mike Bardzilowski who picked 1959’s North by Northwest starring Cary Grant, and New Jersey’s own, Eva Marie Saint. While our generation generally knows Alfred Hitchcock’s horror pictures like Psycho, and The Birds  at this point in Hitchcock’s career he was known as  the masterContinue reading “North by Northwest (1959) | Cinemallennials”

Stardust – Movie Review

Stardust written and directed by Gabriel Range and co-written by Christopher Bell stars Johnny Flynn of Emma fame as a young David Bowie who like a meteor has crashed down hard back to Earth from his first big hit, Space Oddity. Bowie is not only struggling with the forging of his craft, persona, and theContinue reading “Stardust – Movie Review”

The Immigrant (1917) | Cinemallennials

On today’s episode, I talked with my friend Mary Gallagher who picked the 1917 comedy short, The Immigrant starring Charlie Chaplin, Edna Purviance, and Eric Campbell. Chaplin didn’t just star in The Immigrant, he also produced, wrote, directed, composed the music, and edited the film. You can watch The Immigrant here Cinemallennials is a podcastContinue reading “The Immigrant (1917) | Cinemallennials”

The Place of No Words – Movie Review

The Place of No Words, directed by Mark Webber presents a family on the brink of the father’s death (played by Webber) and seeks to explore the concept of death and how the father’s child Bodhi, (played by Webber’s actual son) perceives death through his own eyes. The Place of No Words blends the realityContinue reading “The Place of No Words – Movie Review”